Koh Lanta, Thailand, PADI Divemaster, IDC, scuba diving Thailand

Koh Lanta – The Weather In ‘Rainy Season’

‘Rainy season’, and ‘monsoon season’ are terms often heard when people talk of visiting Koh Lanta, and other west coast of Thailand destinations, between May and September. However, these terms are a little misleading. While it is true there is more rain at this time of year than during the other months, contrary to popular beliefs, it does not rain all day, every day – far from it…

Koh Lanta, Thailand, PADI Divemaster, IDC, scuba diving Thailand
Kantiang Bay, Koh Lanta, during ‘rainy season’…

Does it rain all day, every day ?

According to weather app, yes, it does. But in reality, no, it does not.  The most common weather patterns we experience at this time of year are hot, blue-skied days, with possible heavy rain showers late afternoon/early evening. If you look at rainfall charts for this time of year, there will be a large spike in the amount of rain falling, however, this usually falls in one short, heavy downpour as the day is ending – not as a constant drizzle throughout the whole day as in northern Europe. These 30 – 60 minute downpours are quite spectacular, with a lot of rain falling in a short space of time, and they clear the air and cool things down whilst you are getting ready to venture out for dinner. And they don’t fall every evening…

Scuba diving Thailand, Koh Lanta, Weather, Rain season

The wettest months are the months when the seasons are changing – usually June & September. During these months, you are more likely to encounter the odd wet day, when it does rain through the day, but there is still plenty to do on the island at these times of year too. The months of the so-called ‘rainy season’ between these change-over times are usually as described above – short tropical downpours in the evening, and still nice and hot temperature-wise (even the rain is warm water when it does fall).

These downpours are needed too. After the very dry months of January through April, the island needs a good watering. The wells sometimes run low at the end of the driest months, and the vegetation is calling out for water. The effects of the rain are readily seen – everything quickly becomes greener and lusher, hence the locals refer to this time of year as ‘green season’. The cooling effect of the evening rain is also very welcome. The rain helps lower the humidity, and cool things down for the evening, as well as keeping the dust of dry season down to a minimum.

Is everything on the island closed ?

Another misconception about Koh Lanta is that the island shuts down for green season. This is also not quite true. There are a few businesses that will close for a few months, but many restaurants and bars are open as usual. Also hotels are open as usual, and are often great value at this time of year.

Diving-wise, Koh Lanta Marine Park is closed from May 15th, and re-opens on October 15th. However, the Phi Phi dive sites are open all year and dive trips are still running during this time period.

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Blue skies and calm seas…

Places to go, and things to do in green season…

The National Park at the southern end of Koh Lanta is open, and in all its glory after a bit of rain. It’s always a nice place to relax with its quiet and beautiful beaches, and the lighthouse is a great photo spot.

Just before the National Park the beach at Klong Jark is also very nice. And either before or after a laze on the beach, the short trek to the Klong Jark Waterfall is also spectacular at this time of year – much better than in the dry season.

Koh Lanta Rainy Season, Thailand, Beach, Blue sky, Divemaster Training, PADI IDC

Lanta Old Town is also a great place for a spot of lunch during a drive around the island. Old Town is on the eastern side of Lanta, and a good spot to see a bit of traditional Thai culture, with views over the islands in the bay towards the mainland.

Scuba diving and snorkel trips are available to Phi Phi all year round too. A short sail out across the Andaman Sea, and you can dive or snorkel at some beautiful spots, with some amazing marine life around. Turtles and sharks can be seen regularly, and if you are lucky, you might even get to see the biggest fish in the ocean – the mesmerising whale shark ! Contact Lanta Diver to see their trip schedule – scuba@lantadiver.com

Whale Shark, Koh Lanta, Thailand, Divemaster, PADI IDC

Another activity that many enjoy is to pay a visit to Lanta Animal Welfare, and to maybe even take a dog or two for a walk along the beach…

Where to stay, what to do, and where to eat ?

During green season it is very easy to find a room for your stay, and most resorts offer great value for money at this time of year. Lanta offers accommodation to suit all budgets and needs, but the prices are a little lower during these months. For accommodation, check these places:

Mook Lanta Eco Resort – beautiful boutique resort at the southern end of Long Beach. Nice rooms in a quiet garden setting, just a short walk to the beach. They do a great breakfast too – check out the Mook Muffins !

Sri Lanta – situated in Klong Nin, Sri Lanta is a nice resort with a beachfront area. Nice for a sunset cocktail…

Kaw Kwang Beach Resort – close to the main town of Saladan in the north of Koh Lanta.

Long Beach Chalet – also on Long Beach.

Lanta Riviera – found in the middle of Klong Kong area, close to the beach.

Lanta Sand – at the northern end of Long Beach, within a short distance of many beachfront restaurants.

And when you’re getting a little hungry after a tough day exploring/relaxing…

The Irish Embassy – Great pub food served in a great pub atmosphere, fantastic music, award-winning cocktails, with all your sporting needs on the multi-screens. There’s always something going on here too – Monday is quiz night, Friday is Name That Tune & Killer Pool, with live music midweek too. Situated in the Long Beach area.

May’s Kitchen – To be found close to the Irish Embassy in Long Beach. May’s Kitchen is a favourite amongst the locals. Amazing Thai food, great bbq and ribs, and good selection of western dishes too.

Sole Mare – Italian pizzeria & restaurant in Klong Dao. They have specials on Tuesdays (Pizza Party) and Thursdays (Pasta Party).

The Fat Pig – Also know by its Thai name of Moo Uan, The Fat Pig is located over the water in Saladan, looking out to Koh Lanta Noi. Good ‘pick ‘n’ mix’ breakfast, and live sports shown too.

Ni Restaurant – Small, family-run restaurant close to Relax Bay, at the southern end of Long Beach. Good Thai & western dishes, and nice prices too.

Happy Veggie – If you fancy a healthy, or vegetarian, option, The Happy Veggie is found between the southern end of Long Beach and the northern end of Klong Kong beach.

To find out more about what’s going on in green season, join the Koh Lanta Info Facebook group…

PADI IDC, Divemaster, Thailand, Koh Lanta, Koh Tao, Phuket, Phi Phi

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PADI IDC No Mask Swim, Instructor Course Thailand, Koh Lanta, Phi Phi, Phuket, Tao, Dive Instructor Training

Teaching Tips: No-Mask Swim…

The no-mask swim skill from Confined Water Dive #4 of the PADI Open Water Course is a skill that often appears during the PADI IDC and the Instructor Exams (IE).  There are a few different ways to teach this skill, and the main differences are regarding the organisation of the skill – how to set it up and conduct it underwater.  The mechanics of the skill are relatively simple, yet students may be a little anxious before attempting this skill for the first time.

PADI IDC & Divemaster training in Koh Lanta, Thailand

The performance requirements for this skill state a certain distance must be covered during the swim to successfully complete the skill.  The first thing to think about when organising this skill then, is to ensure the full 15 metres will be covered.  If you are teaching in a pool, then this is very easy to do once you know the dimensions of the pool.  However, if you are teaching in confined open water, from a beach, then you may need to measure the distance using a reel or tape measure.  A tape measure is obviously already marked out with the distances, but if you are using a reel, you may need to add some distance markers yourself.

PADI IDC & Divemaster Training, Koh Lanta, Thailand

I prefer to use a reel, as it is more convenient because it is already a part of my dive equipment, and is easier to stow when not in use.  Along the length of my 40m line, I have used a permanent marker to add a mark every 5 metres – as below:

nav-1

These markings are not just useful for the no-mask swim skill, but for many other skills and dives within the PADI system (e.g. Navigation Adventure Dive, wreck penetration).

Once we are happy that we have a means of ensuring the full 15 metres will be completed, we can think about the other aspects of the organisation of this skill.  First, let’s see what PADI’s Guide To Teaching suggests:

PADI IDC & Divemaster training in Koh Lanta, Thailand

The final sentence in the above excerpt from the Guide To Teaching is an important factor to consider when deciding how to organise this skill.  I find it more beneficial for the students if they work in buddy teams and take turns guiding each other over the 15 metres, rather than the instructor guiding the students.  This strengthens the understanding of the buddy team, makes the skill more realistic as training for the event of a lost mask during a dive, and is extra practice at swimming whilst neutrally buoyant.

During the briefing for this skill, I will let the students know that I will demonstrate the skill with the Divemaster first, and that the students will then perform the skill as buddy teams, switching roles after one buddy team member has completed the skill satisfactorily.  The student with their mask in place can guide the student without the mask by swimming alongside, and holding the other student’s first stage with one hand, and their wrist out in front of them with the other hand.  Having physical contact with the buddy’s wrist during the skill helps the students stay relaxed, especially if they will close their eyes during the practice. I will also inform them that I will be swimming alongside the buddy team, on the side of the diver without a mask.  If I only have one student, then I would take the role of guide as the student performed the skill.

PADI IDC No Mask Swim, Instructor Course Thailand, Koh Lanta, Phi Phi, Phuket, Tao, Dive Instructor Training

I will also tell the students during the briefing that when they are happy with their neutral buoyancy, they can then flood and remove their mask to perform the skill, and that they should then pass the mask to me.  I then hold onto each student’s mask whilst they swim the distance.  It is not a requirement to take the masks from the students, but I find it helps with the realism and conduct of the skill.  In real life, if they lost a mask, it would not be in their hands.  Also, if the instructor has the mask, the student cannot replace the mask too early, before the full 15 metres has been covered.  This method also removes the issues of students dropping their masks during the exercise.  During an IDC or an IE, this method of teaching has then eliminated two of the problems that a Course Director or PADI Examiner can assign during this skill – your anticipation and actions have prevented problems.

Once I am happy that the student has mastered the skill, and completed the full 15 metres comfortably, then I can signal this to them with a tap on the shoulder, and I can place the mask back in the student’s hand – ready to be replaced and cleared to complete the skill.  The same two students would then switch roles, and complete the skill again…

If you have any questions regarding this skill, or any others, please feel free to email and ask us for our advice.  Also, if you are looking to complete a PADI Divemaster or IDC programme, please email and ask for further information about our courses in beautiful Koh Lanta, Thailand – rich@go-pro-in-paradise.com

PADI IDC, Divemaster, Thailand, Koh Lanta, Koh Tao, Phuket, Phi Phi

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PADI IDC & Divemaster courses, Koh Lanta, Thailand

Teaching Tips: Regulator Recovery…

Most instructors, or PADI IDC candidates, have few worries regarding teaching the regulator recovery skill.  They have performed it many times, and most people would consider it to be one of the ‘easier’ skills to teach.  However, with the shift in teaching methodology more towards neutral buoyancy teaching, we just have to be a little careful of meeting the stated performance requirements for this skill when teaching in confined water:

PADI IDC & Divemaster Courses, Confined water teaching presentations.

To teach this skill correctly in confined water, we must ensure that the regulator has been recovered from ‘behind the shoulder‘.  With the old-style teaching, when the students were on their knees, this was quite easy to achieve with either the sweep  method or the reach method of recovery.  However, nowadays, when teaching the skill in a more horizontal position, we have to be careful that the recovery was deemed to be ‘from behind the shoulder‘.  In a horizontal ‘diving position’, the regulator will naturally fall below the shoulder, and if we just use the sweep method of recovery, our students will not meet the performance requirement.

In this horizontal position – on fin-tips or in mid-water – we must use the reach method of recovery, so that the hand reaches behind the shoulder to recover the regulator.  We can also teach the sweep method, so the students learn more and will know two different techniques for recovering their regulator, but the reach method is needed to meet the course performance requirements in confined water.

PADI IDC & Divemaster courses, Koh Lanta, Thailand

To teach this method in Confined Water Dive #1, we must first help the students attain neutral buoyancy and a horizontal position.  One way of doing this is to add little bits of air to their BCDs as you coax them into the correct breathing pattern for diving (read more about this in a previous blog – here).  Once in this horizontal/neutral state, we then continue with the skills from CW#1, including the regulator recovery skill.

During an Open Water Course, I would still teach the sweep method of recovery first, as it is perhaps a little easier.  With the confidence gained from this, we can then move on to the reach method of recovery too, and then we will meet the confined water performance requirements.  Later on in Confined Water Dive #5, we can then re-practise both methods during the mini-dive, whilst swimming around the pool neutrally buoyant.

PADI IDC & Divemaster Courses in Koh Lanta, Thailand.

When we then move to open water, our students can choose to recover the regulator by either method, as PADI Standards do not stipulate that the regulator must be recovered from behind the shoulder in open water (only in confined water).  Personally, I prefer to have the students complete this skill on Open Water Dive #1 whilst swimming along, as they did in Confined Water Dive #5.

Teaching this skill in this manner will help your students be better, more confident divers.  By employing this teaching technique, we have not only met the PADI performance requirements, but we have also taught two different recovery methods, and focused on maintaining and improving the buoyancy of our entry-level students –  make neutral buoyancy a habit, rather than a skill..

During our PADI IDCs on Koh Lanta, Thailand, we focus on neutral buoyancy teaching, and teaching our students to be good instructors, not just to pass an exam.  If you are looking to become a PADI Instructor soon, send us an email if you have any further questions about teaching neutrally buoyant skills.  Likewise, if you are already a PADI MSDT, you could join us for your PADI IDC Staff Course and also get an insight into joining the ranks of instructors who teach skills whilst neutrally buoyant…

PADI IDC, Divemaster, Thailand, Koh Lanta, Koh Tao, Phuket, Phi Phi

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PADI IDC Thailand, Digital Underwater Photography, DUP, Specialty Instructor Training Course

Teaching Tips: PADI DUP Specialty…

PADI IDC Thailand, Digital Underwater Photography, DUP, Specialty Instructor Training Course

One of my favourite PADI Specialties to teach is the Digital Underwater Photography Specialty.  It can be great fun, but also usually you get to see a big improvement in your students’ photography skills.

The course requires two open water dives, the first of which can be conducted in confined water.  Completing this first dive, and the first knowledge review, would also allow you to certify your students to DUP Level 1.  I prefer to teach the full Specialty – two knowledge reviews and two open water dives – and certify my students as DUP Level 2 Divers. I also conduct a confined water dive. I aim to schedule this course over two full days:

Day 1: Classroom session in the morning and confined water session in the afternoon

Day 2: Two open water dives

PADI DUP, Underwater Photography Specialty, IDC, Dive Instructor Course

On the first day, I spend the morning in the classroom.  We review the students’ knowledge reviews, and get to know the camera they will be using on land first – both in and out of the housing.  During the knowledge development session I make sure my students understand all the main concepts – shutter speed, aperture, white balance, depth of field, ISO, scene modes – and make sure they know how to make these adjustments on their camera both in and out of the housing.

PADI DUP, IDC, Underwater Photography, Specialty Instructor

In the afternoon of the first day we hit the pool and put everything we learned in the classroom into practise in this relaxed setting, where we can take our time and practise changing our camera settings, and getting good shots.  I take a few objects into the pool so the students can practise focus, white balance, and depth of field.  I try to find some everyday objects with a few different colours – including red – too to help practise adjusting white balance, and to see how the different scene modes show the different colours.  Whilst in the pool, I also emphasise, and practise, taking photos with good buoyancy control, and without touching the bottom.

PADI Specialty Instructor Course, Underwater Photography, Thailand

On the second day of the course, we head to open water to put everything in to practise with some cool marine life too.  I also take the coloured objects to the ocean to practise white balance adjustments at different depths  during the first dive too.

PADI IDC, DUP Specialty Instructor, Photography

We also spend time finding some cool creatures that are conducive to practising photography.  I focus on creatures that don’t move very far, or very quickly, like nudibranchs, morays, lionfish, clownfish etc., so the students can practise the PADI S.E.A. method…

PADI Instructor Course, Specialty, Photography, Nudibranch

After two days, my students have normally improved a great deal in their photography abilities, and are happy with the pace and content of the course.  If you would like to know more about becoming a PADI Digital Underwater Photography Specialty Instructor, please send me and email and ask…

 

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PADI IDC Prep, RDP eRDPml, Dive Theory Exams, IE

PADI IDC Study Tips: The RDP

Remember the RDP ?  You know, that blue and white thing you last used during your Open Water course ?  How about the eRDPml ? Well you should be up-to-speed with both of these and comfortable with all aspects of their use before arriving at your PADI IDC

PADI IDC Prep, RDP eRDPml, Dive Theory Exams, IE

The PADI Divemaster course should have left you comfortable with both the RDP and the eRDPml, but all too often I see IDC candidates spending their evenings trying to remember how to work out minimum surface intervals when they should be learning new information and preparing their teaching presentations for the next day.  If you are a little rusty with the use of either version of the RDP, then here’s some tips to help you arrive at your IDC confident with both versions of the PADI RDP:

1. Read through the ‘Instructions For Use’ booklets for both versions

The instruction booklets that come with both the RDP and the eRDPml are very good at explaining the two products.  The booklets walk you through how to use the products from the beginning with example questions to work through as you go.  They are an excellent way to refresh your memory, especially for minimum surface intervals…

PADI IDC Prep, RDP Instructions, Dive Theory Exams, Minimum Surface Interval

2. Go through the PADI Open Water Diver Course Quizzes and Exams

Inside this booklet you will find the ‘RDP Table and eRDPml Quiz’, the ‘RDP Table and eRDPml Final Exam’, and the ‘eRDPml Multilevel Quiz’.  All three of these have two versions – A & B.  You should try all of these questions, and be comfortable finding the correct answers without any issues. Every PADI dive centre and instructor should have a copy of this exam booklet for you to look over.  There is a copy included in the IDC Crew Pak too.

PADI IDC Prep, Dive Theory Exams, RDP eRDPml Questions, Open Water Exam

3. Visit the Study Tools page of our website

The Go Pro In Paradise website has a ‘PADI IDC Study Tools‘ page designed to help people prepare for their PADI IDC.  There are study notes and practise exams for each of the five topics of the dive theory exams – Physics, Physiology, Equipment, Dive Skills & The Environment, and Decompression Theory – plus some extra downloadable questions to help you practise with both the RDP and eRDPml.  There are also links to videos to help you remember your knots…

4. Check out our YouTube channel

The Go Pro In Paradise YouTube channel has videos covering different aspects of dive theory – including physics, physiology, and dive planning.  The dive planning videos are designed to help you work through some of the different types of questions that can be asked on the PADI IDC and IE dive theory exams with both the RDP and the eRDPml.

PADI IDC Prep, Dive Theory Exams, RDP eRDPml

Following these four steps before your IDC will help you arrive much more relaxed.  You will also have much more time during the IDC to focus on the new information being presented rather than studying what you should already know…

If you would like any further information about the PADI IDC process, or how to prepare for it, please feel free to send me an email and ask – rich@go-pro-in-paradise.com

PADI IDC Thailand, Platinum Course Director Richard reardon
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PADI IDC, Delayed SMB Specialty Instructor, Platinum Course Director, Divemaster, IDC

The PADI Delayed SMB Specialty

Using a delayed SMB is a skill many dive professionals take for granted – as they have used them so often.  Many forget that first attempt at using one, which often doesn’t go as planned. Ask an instructor who teaches the Divemaster course regularly – they often see the struggles of that first try.  There are also many options for using one.  The chances are that if you ask ten dive professionals about their preferences for using/stowing a delayed SMB, you will get ten differing answers…

PADI IDC, Delayed SMB Specialty Instructor, Platinum Course Director, Divemaster, IDC

Firstly, let’s clear up the difference between an ‘SMB’ and a ‘dSMB’.  ‘SMB’ stands for surface marker buoy, also commonly known as ‘the safety sausage’.  The difference between the two is, basically, where they are inflated – an ‘SMB’ is inflated at the surface, or permanently inflated, whereas a ‘dSMB’ (delayed surface marker buoy) is inflated underwater towards the end of a dive.  An SMB can either be towed for the whole dive, or just used at the surface to signalling the boat if you are a little further away than you thought.

Personally, I much prefer to use a dSMB at the end of every dive.  I like to have a marker on the surface to keep boat traffic away as I ascend with my students, and am not fond of towing an SMB for the whole dive (I don’t dive in areas where this is required by law).

The PADI Delayed SMB Diver Distinctive Specialty is designed for instructors to teach their students how to safely master this skill.  The aim is for us to talk through the different options and try a few different techniques, and the student can decide which they prefer.  We can show them the different methods of inflation – alternate air source, oral, exhaled bubbles, LPI – and also the difference between a reel and a spool (and the different designs of both). We can also discuss and show the option for deploying a dSMB without a reel or line too, and the advantages of an orange line over a white one. I like to mark distances on my lines too so students can see their depth when reeling in and show them how that works. This is also useful when teaching wreck or navigation dives/Specialties.

PADI IDC, Navigation Dive, Reel Spool, dSMB, Specialty Instructor

The students then get to practise this skill under controlled conditions with instructor supervision.  We talk them through the different options during the knowledge development first, and could even do a confined water dive to practise first too.  During the open water dives the students get to first try the skill in a stationary position, and then from mid-water on dive two.  The more different options they can try, the better.  Once deployed, the students then have to swim with the dSMB and make a controlled ascent, reeling the line in. After a safety stop, a final ascent to the surface is made, and the dSMB is stowed for the next dive once back on the boat.

PADI IDC, Delayed SMB, Specialty Instructor, Platinum Course Director Richard Reardon

The correct and safe use of a dSMB is an extremely valuable skill for every diver.  It’s a great course to teach, and students get great satisfaction when they master the skill. As a dSMB Specialty Instructor you can also offer dive one of the Specialty as an Adventure Dive during your Advanced Open Water Courses – another reason for obtaining this Specialty Instructor rating. I would recommend adding it on to your PADI IDC course, or including it in your MSDT Prep programme…

If you’d like more information about this, or any other, PADI Specialty, feel free to send me an email and ask for further details…

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Neutrally Buoyant PADI IDC

At Go Pro In Paradise we are trying to push more and more towards neutrally buoyant skills during our PADI IDC programmes at PADI CDC Lanta Diver on Koh Lanta, Thailand. We are trying to stay off the knees, and teaching more on fin-tips or in mid-water. The dive environment is becoming ever more fragile, and we need to train the future generation of divers to be even more environmentally aware, and with even better buoyancy skills than in the past.  There is no need to spend any time on the knees during diver training – we should promote proper weighting and positioning in the water right from the first moment new divers get their heads under the water.

PADI IDC Thailand, Neutrally Buoyant, Platinum Course Director

It starts with Confined Water Dive #1 of the Open Water Course.  During our IDCs, the first time we take our IDC Candidates in the pool we conduct a CW Dive #1 workshop, and teach our candidates the importance of not over-weighting their future students, and how to get them neutrally buoyant before proceeding with the rest of the skills in CW Dive #1.  We achieve this by teaching the ‘Breathing Underwater’ skill as an introduction to the fin pivot (as described in a previous post).  All other skills in confined water can then be performed on fin-tips.

PADI IDC Thailand, Neutrally Buoyant, Platinum Course Director

We also then conduct a neutrally buoyant skill circuit, with all skills demonstrated on fin-tips – staying off the knees.

PADI IDC Thailand, Neutrally Buoyant, Platinum Course Director

PADI IDC Thailand, Neutrally Buoyant, Platinum Course Director

After this skill circuit, we then conduct a Confined Water Dive #5 workshop, where we teach our IDC candidates how to help their Open Water students to make the transition from performing skills on their fin-tips to now performing them mid-water whilst swimming around the pool neutrally buoyant.  We also highlight the importance of correct weighting and the value of practising swimming in shallow water without touching the bottom or breaking the surface – demonstrating good trim and horizontal body position.

PADI IDC Thailand, Neutrally Buoyant, Platinum Course Director

PADI IDC Thailand, Neutrally Buoyant, Platinum Course Director

PADI IDC Thailand, Neutrally Buoyant, Platinum Course Director

For the rest of the IDC, we then expect our candidates to perform all their teaching presentations in this manner.  Hopefully we can do our bit to inspire the next generation of PADI dive instructors to teach better buoyancy, trim, and environmental awareness in their future Open Water Courses…

PADI IDC Thailand, Neutrally Buoyant, Platinum Course Director

If you would like to know more about our PADI IDC programmes, please feel free to visit our website, or to send us an email

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