The Navigation Adventure Dive

As a new instructor, the Navigation Adventure Dive can seem a little daunting – there’s lots to do, but we also want to save some time to swim around and explore the dive site too.  It’s a dive we conduct often – it is a compulsory core dive on the Advanced Open Water Course. We obviously need to make sure all our students meet performance requirements, but we also want to work efficiently to allow that time for exploring the dive site and practising actual diving !

The first thing to consider when planning a Navigation Adventure Dive is when and where you will conduct this dive.  I would never plan to conduct this dive as the first dive of an Advanced Open Water Course, I would prefer to see my divers in the water first.  Ideally, I like to conduct Peak Performance Buoyancy as the first dive of an AOWC, and certainly before the Navigation Dive.  Another thing to bear in mind is depth and site selection.  It’s preferable to conduct the Navigation Dive on a shallow site, with relatively open sandy areas.  Also, a site with little or no current is ideal.  Aiming for a shallower site is another reason not to plan this as the first dive of the course.  I prefer to plan my Navigation Dives as either second or third dives of the course – it’s also not a nice dive to finish the course with for the students.

Now let’s have a look at the performance requirements – what the students must achieve…

Navigation Dive, Advanced Open Water Course, Teaching Tips, PADI IDC

Okay, so we need to get ourselves organised before we tackle those performance requirements.  We need to get our instructional equipment together first.  Our students should each have a compass, as per PADI standards, for every Adventure Dive.  But for me, we also need a reel/spool – that’s how I measure the 30 metres for skill #2, and I also then use it as a baseline, and a way of measuring performance requirements, for the other skills.  I have a reel and a spool, and I have marked them both off for distances every five metres.  I also made sure when I bought my reel and my spool that I selected ones with orange lines, rather than the more common white. The orange line is much easier to see (when using a dSMB, or conducting wreck penetration, as well as when laying it on the floor for Navigation skills). I then marked my lines every five metres as below:

Navigation Dive, Advanced Open Water Course, Teaching Tips, PADI IDC

I have always used a Dive Rite Safety Reel, and have also, more recently, added the new Apeks Lifeline Spool to my kit bag, as pictured below:

PADI IDC, Navigation Dive, Reel Spool

Once I have laid this line out, carefully avoiding damaging any aquatic life, I am ready to start the skills with my students.  If there is a slight current, I will try to set the line perpendicular to it. Skill #1 will be combined with all the other skills and monitored throughout the dive.  Skill #2 is pretty straight forward, but the trick is to avoid this turning into a race along the line.  I am very careful how I brief this skill – I brief that the 30m swim should be at a normal dive pace, and that I will set the speed by swimming in front of the students, emphasising that they should not overtake me.  I instruct the students to count their own kick cycles, and I time the swim.  The number of kicks and time can then be noted on the Adventure Dive Data Carrier slates.  I perform this skill twice – once in each direction to ascertain an average.  This is especially important if there is a slight current.

The next skill is the natural navigation swim, returning within 15m from the start point.  This is a skill that needs to be briefed well too.  We need to emphasise what features to look for in the reef formations/topography, and also to point out that often things will look different when returning in the opposite direction.  I brief my students to look back at a reference point as they pass it to get an idea of how it will look on the return leg.  I also brief the importance of slow relaxed swimming – the normal dive pace – and tell them how many kick cycles I would like them to complete before turning around.  I start this skill from the centre point of my 30m baseline – the 15 metre mark.  I now have 15 metres of line either side of the start, so I can very easily see if the students have met the performance requirement, which is to return within 15 metres of their start point.

Skill #4 is then combined with skill #5. Correct positioning/handling of a compass to swim a reciprocal heading.  I also remind the students they can also incorporate some natural navigation techniques as used in the previous skill into this exercise – especially if there is a little current.  For the skill #4 element of this reciprocal heading swim, I do emphasise that the compass must be level, and that the lubber line must be pointing in the desired direction of travel, but I do not insist they hold the compass in the manner pictured below during the entire exercise – because nobody dives like this, ever – it just needs to be held correctly when checking the heading/direction !

Navigation Dive, Advanced Open Water Course, Teaching Tips, PADI IDC

Rather than insist on the above position, I brief students to use natural navigation in conjunction with the compass – keeping the compass level, point it ahead, and pick out a natural feature in line with the lubber line, then when they reach that feature, they can again hold the compass level with the lubber line in the correct direction and pick another natural feature – this is a more natural, ‘realistic’ way to navigate with a compass. This is also a much better technique if there is any current – if people just stare at the compass in a current they may not notice they are being pushed off course. Also bear in mind that nowadays people may be using a digital compass on their dive computer, so you might need to cover how to calibrate and use that version of a compass.  Again, we need to cover how many kick cycles before turning in the briefing.  I also start this skill from the same 15 metre mark on my baseline, so I can check that they meet the performance requirement of returning to within six metres of the starting point – I have a mark on my baseline five metres either side of the starting point…

With both skill #3 and skill #4, if conditions are good enough, and my divers are also competent enough, I can send two buddy teams off simultaneously if I have four students. I assign one member of each buddy team the task of navigating with the compass (setting the heading by pointing the lubber line in the correct direction and rotating the bezel so the north arrow is between the two index markers), whilst the other will be counting their own kick cycles and tapping the shoulder of the buddy to signal time to turn around. To turn around, the buddy member with the compass just needs to turn their body until the south arrow is in between the two index markers.

Before I allow a buddy team to begin the swim, I position myself directly in front of them, blocking their path, until I am happy they have set the compass correctly, then I move to the side and let them begin.  Once buddy team #1 has started, I position myself directly in front of the second buddy team until I am happy their compass is also set correctly before I allow then to swim. Once the second buddy team have started, quite often the first buddy team is arriving back, and I can have them swap roles and repeat the skill. This helps me work more efficiently and have time to explore the dive site once all skills are completed:

Navigation Dive, Advanced Open Water Course, Teaching Tips, PADI IDC

Once everybody has performed each role for the reciprocal heading compass swim, the final skill is the square pattern.  For this, I also get the two buddy teams swimming in different directions at the same time (conditions and competency allowing) to work efficiently:

Navigation Dive, Advanced Open Water Course, Teaching Tips, PADI IDC

Again, I start from the 15 metre mark of my line and use the marks on my line to gauge whether they have met the performance requirements of returning to within eight metres of the starting point.  I prefer to use the Suunto SK8 compasses for this dive too, as they have all four cardinal points on the face, and not just a north arrow.  This makes this square pattern, and the search patterns in the Rescue Diver and Search & Recovery Specialty, much easier too.  Again, for the first heading, the students need to point the lubber line in the right direction and turn the bezel until the two index markers are over the north arrow.  Now, when they come to make the first 90 degree turn, for a turn to the right, they do not need to touch the bezel, they just need to turn the body until the east arrow is between the two index markers, and on the next turn, the south arrow between the two markers.  For a left turn, they would turn the body until the west arrow is between the index markers.

I ask the students to set the first side of the square to follow the direction of my baseline (as in the picture above).  This means their final leg of the square will be back towards the line, so again I can see how close to the start point they finish.  And once more, when the buddy teams return, I get them to swap roles and repeat the skill.

Another key to making this dive run smoothly and efficiently underwater is to practise these skills on land before the dive.  I like to do this with a towel over the students’ heads, so all they can see is the compass, and to learn to trust it (and me!).

And that is basically how I try to run the Navigation Adventure Dive.  As I mentioned above, sometimes conditions or student skill level means I need to adapt my approach a little.  But this is the Advanced Course, and the students, as certified divers, should be good enough to swim a short distance away from the instructor, and allowing them that little extra freedom will also help them become more confident divers…

If you have any questions about how I run my Navigation Adventure Dives, or would like to take an Underwater Navigator Specialty Instructor Training Course to see it first hand, please feel free to email and ask for more information…

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One thought on “The Navigation Adventure Dive

  1. Pingback: The PADI Delayed SMB Specialty – Go Pro In Paradise

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